Comics Legend Stan Lee recently paid tribute to his late colleague, artist Steve Ditko. The two were responsible for co-creating some of Marvel Comics' most popular characters together, including Spider-Man and Doctor Strange.

Ditko and Lee first collaborated together in 1955 at Atlas Comics - the company that would one day become Marvel Comics. The two later pioneered a new style of comic book creation, which became known as The Marvel Method, where artists had a greater ability to develop the stories they were drawing after being given a brief plot summary. This resulted in the artist being able to better work their own ideas into the narrative, such as when Steve Ditko created Spider-Man's web-shooters and the Spider-Signal light on his belt. Given Lee's busy work load as Editor-In-Chief and writer on a dozen titles, Ditko frequented plotted the early issues of The Amazing Spider-Man in addition to drawing them, leaving Lee to write the dialogue once the art was complete.

Related: Marvel & DC Remember Legendary Comics Creator Steve Ditko

Lee voiced his thoughts on Ditko in a video on his personal Twitter account, which can be viewed below. Known for his bombastic and overly enthusiastic descriptions, Lee was uncharacteristically morose as he spoke about his former collaborator, describing Ditko simply as "one of the most important creators in the comic book business."

Lee added:

"I worked with him for many years and he was always impressed with how he saw everything in terms of photos and pictures and movement and scenes. He told the story like a fine movie director would."

Lee and Ditko famously had a falling out, which resulted in Ditko leaving Marvel Comics in 1966. The reasons for the end of the partnership have never been clear, with Lee pleading ignorance and Ditko refusing to speak about the matter. One rumor has it that Ditko felt that Lee was hogging all the credit for their work together - a complaint that would later be mirrored by the equally legendary Jack Kirby. Another comic history legend says it started with a disagreement over who should be revealed as the secret identity of The Green Goblin (Lee wanted it to be Norman Osborn, the father of Peter Parker's best friend, Harry, whereas Ditko wanted it to be an original character) and ended with Ditko becoming annoyed when Lee, as Editor in Chief, pulled-rank and refused to discuss the subject any further.

Whatever the case, it is all water under the bridge now and Lee was nothing but complementary regarding his late collaborator in his tribute video. Whatever animosity may have existed between the two Marvel Comics mainstays at one time, Lee was clearly shaken and choked-up as he spoke about Ditko's contributions to the world of comic books. With characters such as Spider-Man and Doctor Strange, Steve Ditko's legacy is certain to stand the test of time.

More: Tom Holland Honors Steve Ditko

Source: Stan Lee