Archive for October 6, 2019

Samuel L. Jackson Stings Back at Martin Scorsese’s Marvel Comments

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Samuel L. Jackson isn't too impressed either way with Martin Scorsese's recent comments about Marvel movies not being true cinema.

Crawl Director Alexandre Aja Talks Crafting His Killer Alligator Horror Flick [Exclusive]

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We talk with Alexandre Aja about his latest movie Crawl and his career making horror movies in our exclusive interview.

Lost City of Z True Story: The Real Percy Fawcett Expedition Explained

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The Lost City of Z movie told the true story of British explorer Percy Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam) but condensed his life to suit the film's running time. Directed by James Gray (Ad Astra), The Lost City of Z is based on the 2009 book of the same title by David Grann, who embarked on his own journey into the Amazon to retrace Fawcett's path, uncovering new evidence on how he may have died. The film keeps Fawcett's final fate ambiguous, leaving it to the audience's imagination to decide what happened to Fawcett and his companion and eldest son, Jack (Tom Holland).

The Lost City of Z spans 1905 - 1925 and details how Percy Fawcett was tasked by Sir George Goldie (Ian McDiarmid) and the Royal Geographical Society to survey the Amazon jungle between the borders of Bolivia and Brazil, which are on the brink of conflict. Fawcett agrees to restore his family's good name, which had been ruined by his alcoholic father. En route to Brazil, Fawcett meets Corporal Henry Costin (Robert Pattinson), an explorer knowledgable about the Amazon. Despite near-fatal encounters with the local Indian tribes, Fawcett completes the mission and he discovers pottery that leads him to believe in the existence of an ancient lost city of gold.

Next: Mary Queen of Scots True Story: What The Movie Gets Right And Changes

Fawcett's belief in this "Lost City of Z" is further fueled by his discovery of a conquistador text referencing such a place. Fawcett's second expedition to find the Lost City, financed by Scottish biologist James Murray (Angus Macfadyen) ends in disaster and Fawcett resigns from the RGS. After fighting in World War I, Fawcett's third expedition into the Amazon is financed in 1923 by a consortium of American newspapers eager for him to discover the fabled ancient city. Fawcett and his son Jack embark on their mission, but after a strange encounter with the natives, Percy and Jack vanish in the jungle in 1925. Left behind in England, Fawcett's wife Nina (Sienna Miller) believes her husband and son are still alive.

The biggest change The Lost City of Z makes to Percy Fawcett's true story is boiling down his eight expeditions into the Amazon to just three. Further, Percy's final journey was depicted to just be him and Jack, which pays off the father-son conflict of the film where Jack accuses Percy of abandoning the family while he explored the jungle and fought in the Great War. In reality, there was a third person who joined the Fawcetts: Raleigh Rimmell, who was Jack's friend. All three of them vanished in the jungle in 1925 and were never heard from again. Fawcett's expedition was financed by J.D. Rockefeller and American newspapers, and he suddenly stopped sending dispatches from the jungle. Nina Fawcett received a letter from Percy dated May 29, 1925 - the last correspondence ever from Fawcett - that said "You have no fear of any failure." referring to his search for the Lost City of Z.

After Fawcett vanished, 13 expeditions were sent into the Amazon to find him and, later, determine how he died. Peter Fleming, the brother of James Bond creator Ian Fleming, went on one of these failed expeditions. In 2005, author David Grann went into Brazil to retrace Fawcett's steps. In his book, he determined that Fawcett and his team made to Dead Horse Camp, where the Kalapalo natives told Grann that there was a white explorer (believed to be Fawcett) who was warned not to go eastward into hostile territory controlled by "fierce Indians." The men ignored the warning and never returned. If this was Fawcett and his group, then they were likely killed by the neighboring hostiles. Alternatively, they may have simply succumbed to illness in the unforgiving jungle.

Fawcett gained a reputation as one of Britain's greatest explorers, and the adventures of Indiana Jones were partially inspired by Fawcett's explorations. However, in 2017, Canadian explorer John Hemming published a scathing dismissal of Fawcett's legend and portrayal in the film, calling him "a racist" and "a nutter." In The Lost City of Z, Fawcett argued in front of the RGS that the Amazon natives were equal to Europeans - a scene that was fabricated. The real Percy Fawcett was respectful but looked down on South Americans since, despite his travels, he was still a product of Victorian/Edwardian society.

Next: Spotlight True Story: The Movie's Real Boston Scandal Explained

Lost City of Z True Story: The Real Percy Fawcett Expedition Explained

0

The Lost City of Z movie told the true story of British explorer Percy Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam) but condensed his life to suit the film's running time. Directed by James Gray (Ad Astra), The Lost City of Z is based on the 2009 book of the same title by David Grann, who embarked on his own journey into the Amazon to retrace Fawcett's path, uncovering new evidence on how he may have died. The film keeps Fawcett's final fate ambiguous, leaving it to the audience's imagination to decide what happened to Fawcett and his companion and eldest son, Jack (Tom Holland).

The Lost City of Z spans 1905 - 1925 and details how Percy Fawcett was tasked by Sir George Goldie (Ian McDiarmid) and the Royal Geographical Society to survey the Amazon jungle between the borders of Bolivia and Brazil, which are on the brink of conflict. Fawcett agrees to restore his family's good name, which had been ruined by his alcoholic father. En route to Brazil, Fawcett meets Corporal Henry Costin (Robert Pattinson), an explorer knowledgable about the Amazon. Despite near-fatal encounters with the local Indian tribes, Fawcett completes the mission and he discovers pottery that leads him to believe in the existence of an ancient lost city of gold.

Next: Mary Queen of Scots True Story: What The Movie Gets Right And Changes

Fawcett's belief in this "Lost City of Z" is further fueled by his discovery of a conquistador text referencing such a place. Fawcett's second expedition to find the Lost City, financed by Scottish biologist James Murray (Angus Macfadyen) ends in disaster and Fawcett resigns from the RGS. After fighting in World War I, Fawcett's third expedition into the Amazon is financed in 1923 by a consortium of American newspapers eager for him to discover the fabled ancient city. Fawcett and his son Jack embark on their mission, but after a strange encounter with the natives, Percy and Jack vanish in the jungle in 1925. Left behind in England, Fawcett's wife Nina (Sienna Miller) believes her husband and son are still alive.

The biggest change The Lost City of Z makes to Percy Fawcett's true story is boiling down his eight expeditions into the Amazon to just three. Further, Percy's final journey was depicted to just be him and Jack, which pays off the father-son conflict of the film where Jack accuses Percy of abandoning the family while he explored the jungle and fought in the Great War. In reality, there was a third person who joined the Fawcetts: Raleigh Rimmell, who was Jack's friend. All three of them vanished in the jungle in 1925 and were never heard from again. Fawcett's expedition was financed by J.D. Rockefeller and American newspapers, and he suddenly stopped sending dispatches from the jungle. Nina Fawcett received a letter from Percy dated May 29, 1925 - the last correspondence ever from Fawcett - that said "You have no fear of any failure." referring to his search for the Lost City of Z.

After Fawcett vanished, 13 expeditions were sent into the Amazon to find him and, later, determine how he died. Peter Fleming, the brother of James Bond creator Ian Fleming, went on one of these failed expeditions. In 2005, author David Grann went into Brazil to retrace Fawcett's steps. In his book, he determined that Fawcett and his team made to Dead Horse Camp, where the Kalapalo natives told Grann that there was a white explorer (believed to be Fawcett) who was warned not to go eastward into hostile territory controlled by "fierce Indians." The men ignored the warning and never returned. If this was Fawcett and his group, then they were likely killed by the neighboring hostiles. Alternatively, they may have simply succumbed to illness in the unforgiving jungle.

Fawcett gained a reputation as one of Britain's greatest explorers, and the adventures of Indiana Jones were partially inspired by Fawcett's explorations. However, in 2017, Canadian explorer John Hemming published a scathing dismissal of Fawcett's legend and portrayal in the film, calling him "a racist" and "a nutter." In The Lost City of Z, Fawcett argued in front of the RGS that the Amazon natives were equal to Europeans - a scene that was fabricated. The real Percy Fawcett was respectful but looked down on South Americans since, despite his travels, he was still a product of Victorian/Edwardian society.

Next: Spotlight True Story: The Movie's Real Boston Scandal Explained

You’re Pronouncing Timothée Chalamet’s Name Wrong (Even He Is)

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Actor Timothée Chalamet may be an A-list Hollywood star, but most people don’t correctly pronounce his name. Don't worry, though, because even Chalamet doesn’t seem too concerned about the diacritical mark hovering over his first name.

Chalamet became a household name, ironically, thanks to his performance in Luca Guadagnino’s 2017 coming-of-age drama Call Me by Your Name. That same year, Chalamet portrayed the brooding heartthrob Kyle Scheible in Greta Gerwig’s Oscar-nominated film Lady Bird. Throughout his career, Chalamet has consistently proven himself on screen, dating all the way back to an early performance in Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar. In 2019 alone, the 23-year-old actor headlined Woody Allen’s A Rainy Day in New York and David Michôd’s The King, and has a prominent role as the lead male in Gerwig’s Little Women. Still, many people struggle mightily when pronouncing Timothée Chalamet."

Related: The Best Movie Endings Of The Decade

Chalamet’s name derives from his father's French heritage. The family surname is pronounced “SHALL-AH-MAY.” During an August 2019 appearance on The Graham Norton Show, Timothée stated that he’s “97 percent” fluent in French, and that his first name is technically pronounced, in proper French, as “TEE-MO-TAY.” But Chalamet often goes by what his first name looks like: “TIMM-O-THEE.” He told Norton, “It’s whatever you like.” In the clip, Chalamet appears alongside his Little Women co-star, Saoirse Ronan, who similarly must often explain the correct pronunciation of her name. Check out the clip below.

In 2018, while speaking to E!, Chalamet and Ronan discussed the weirdest pronunciations of their first names. According to the male performer, his last name is “butchered” a lot, and he was once identified as Timothée “CHAIR-MONT.” In general, Chalamet seems to embrace the various pronunciations of his first and last names, and doesn’t seem to mind if fans and critics alike simply call him “Timothy.” But for all the die-hard Chalamet fans out there, the accent in Timothée is key. If you ever meet the actor in person, it be may worthwhile to correctly pronounce his name: TEE-MO-TAY SHALL-AH-MAY, which has a much better ring than Tim “CHAIR-MONT.”

Of course, Chalamet and Ronan aren't the only two people in the industry with hard to pronounce names. Other well known actors such as Chiwetel Ejiofor and Ioan Gruffudd have had their names butchered over the years. Others, like Charlize Theron and Ralph Fiennes, may have names that appear easy to pronounce, but even then people tend to get them wrong.

More: Little Women 2019 Cast & Character Guide

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