Archive for April 19, 2020

Tommy Wiseau’s The Room Is Even More Ridiculous In Dreams

0

An iconic scene from Tommy Wiseau's The Room has been re-created in Media Molecule's Dreams and has somehow become even stranger. The Room, released in 2003 and written, directed, and starring mysterious and eccentric filmmaker Tommy Wiseau, is widely considered one of the worst movies ever made. The Room follows Johnny, a banker whose future wife Lisa cheats on him with his best friend, Mark. The film's countless unresolved subplots, bizarre recurring themes, and laughable performances have led to a massive cult following with countless midnight theatre screenings and even a James Franco movie about its creation, The Disaster Artist. It's still as fun to watch today, and tribute and references to the epitome of so-bad-it's-good film still make the rounds in pop culture after seventeen years.

One such place to create tributes and re-makes of classic games, movies, and other works of art is the PlayStation exclusive Dreams, which launched out of Early Access this February. From LittleBigPlanet developer Media Molecule, Dreams provides players with a wide variety of creation tools that let users sculpt, paint, compose, record, program, and playtest whatever they want, as well as collaborate and share their creations with other players. Some creations are incredibly realistic, walking simulators, while others are fan projects for beloved shows. Some of the most impressive players have been hired by the developers, who went on to specify that players could even profit off their work made in the game.

Related: 10 Movies Where The Acting Is So Bad It's Good

In a short video tweeted by Wiseau, some users use the infinite possibilities of Dreams to make their own spin on an iconic scene from The Room. Johnny, upon hearing that Lisa is lying about domestic abuse, storms onto the roof, exclaiming, "It's not true, it's bullsh-t! I did not hit her! I did not!" After angrily throwing a water bottle, he spots his best friend Mark off-camera and calmly says, "Oh hi, Mark." The apparent green-screen background, strange delivery from Wiseau, particularly on "I did not!" and complete reversal of tone when greeting Mark, makes the scene a memorable standout in a movie packed with oddity. Johnny's lines are perfectly synced and animated within Dreams, although the video ends slightly differently than its source material.

Many Dreams players have uploaded short videos or playable experiences base don existing IPs and franchises. However, not all are viewed innocently, after Nintendo shut down many games based on its mascot Mario. Wiseau himself tweeting out the video--with no caption, so its creator remains unknown--signifies that he's not that bothered by re-creations of his infamous movie within Dreams. This is true to form for the quirky director, who once created a mash-up between his work and the Marvel cinematic universe. It's possible that Wiseau even made this himself. For one, the creator of this clip certainly knew a lot about The Room, as the ending references other scenes in the movie where Johnny, Mark, and their friends inexplicably throw a football around.

Dreams is a remarkable and ambitious project by Media Molecule, which encourages creativity and collaboration and has led to some breathtaking visuals, clever games, and catchy music for players to enjoy. Still, it's good to know there will never be a shortage of creations that don't take themselves too seriously, like this weird, silly homage to one of the strangest films ever made. Maybe one day, Tommy Wiseau will re-create the entirety of The Room in Dreams, but until then, this 10-second clip should satiate fans of the disasterpiece.

Next: Dreams Review: A Stellar And Enjoyable Creation Tool

Source: Twitter

Too Hot to Handle: Who is Bryce From Netflix’s Hot New Show?

0

Bryce entered at a strange time on Too Hot To Handle. It wasn't clear whether the show was going to welcome new arrivals, and then all of a sudden here comes this random dude who brags about sleeping with a different woman every night.

The season started with 10 people on the cast. Bryce was the eleventh person to join. Fortunately for him, not all the the originals had been coupled up by that point. He found an opportunity with Chloe, who had been flirting with David but that didn't work out. She was intrigued by Bryce. They started spending time together, and eventually Chloe was willing to kiss him. It went well for Bryce. Chloe realized after the $3,000 kiss that Bryce wasn't right for her. She broke it off with him. Bryce didn't have luck with anyone else for the remainder of the show. He wasn't alone in being alone. Kelz, Nicole and Madison weren't with anyone for the entirety of their stay at the retreat. In the finale, Bryce painted his body with the word "UGLY," which is something he said he's been called in the past. We were supposed to feel sympathy for him, I guess, even though he said he has sex every night with a rotating cast of women.

Related: Too Hot To Handle: Who Is Kelz From Netflix's Hot New Show?

According to Reality Tidbit, Bryce studied film production at Loyola Marymount in Los Angeles. He worked on the 2018 film Counterfeiters. He also considers himself a singer-songwriter, although his singing wasn't great during the sailor-themed party on Too Hot To Handle. That was the theme because Bryce lives on a boat in Marina Del Ray.

When Bryce arrived at the retreat, he sounded like he was ready to start hooking up with as many women as possible. Unlike the other late entrants, Bryce wasn't told about the twist before he arrived. He was shocked to find out that if he did anything naughty, there would be a fine.

He still took the risk with Chloe because, like the others, he's probably not hurting for cash. Plus, since we found out that they all split the cash prize, a kiss really only cost him $300. That's nothing, especially considering all the fame and money that will come from being on a hit Netflix reality show. Bryce didn't find love at the retreat, but we shouldn't feel too bad for him. He found what he was looking for, what they were all looking for, which was some more attention so they would be more desirable to attractive people at home.

Next: Too Hot To Handle: Who Is Nicole From Netflix's Hot New Show?

Source: Reality Tidbit

What Denis Villenueve’s Previous Movies Reveal About Dune

0

Denis Villenueve's long-awaited adaptation of Frank Herbert's hugely influential science fiction epic Dune is still set to come out in December 2020 in spite of a wave of film delays in the face of the coronavirus epidemic, and his previous films may provide insight into what he has in store for the film. Dune, just one of dozens of science fictions works created by prolific American author Frank Herbert, follows the political and religious struggles on Arrakis, a barren and inhospitable desert planet that serves as the only source of melange, a spice-like substance that provides extended life and psychic abilities, among other properties. The novel's complex examination of gender roles, hero worship, imperialism, and religious dogma made it a massive success upon release in 1965, winning several awards including the Nebula as well as tying for the Hugo. Dune's influence is still felt over five decades after its release and can be seen in Star Wars, Alien, the successful Warhammer 40k series, and many others.

Previous adaptations of Dune have varied from the incomplete to the critically panned. Notoriously eccentric filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky began work on a 14-hour "re-imagining" of the source material in 1975, but funding dried up for the project before it could be completed. David Lynch also tried his hand at the so-called "unfilmable" novel, but the result was a maligned 1984 film that took major liberties with the material and veered in the direction of camp, and Lynch removed his name from some cuts of the film. Last, in 2000, the Sci-Fi Channel released a three-part miniseries starring William Hurt and Alec Newman. Rumors of a contemporary theatrical adaptation have been circling for as long as 2008, but nothing concrete solidified until February 1, 2017, when Frank Herbert's son Brian confirmed that a new adaptation was in place - a two-part saga directed by Denis Villenueve.

Related: Dune Cast Guide: Who Every Character Is In Villenueve's Sci-Fi Movie

Villenueve has discussed at length his admiration for the source material, as well as his plans for honoring Dune while also updating some of its more dated elements. The French-Canadian director has had an acclaimed career in the 22 years he's been active, directing a wide variety of projects in different genres. These films can all provide some context for what Villenueve's adaptation of Dune will look like and give fans a little more to be excited about come December.

While not his first film, Villenueve's Incendies (based on a 2003 play) is without a doubt one of his most complex, following two Canadian twins who decide to visit an unknown country in the Middle East, the birthplace of their Arab mother, at her behest. Standing in the way of their journey, however, is a bloody civil war that slowly begins to reveal the haunting tragedies that shaped their mother into the woman they knew. Officially released on September 17, 2010, the movie received critical acclaim from reviewers and was nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the 83rd Academy Awards.

Dune, of course, does not take place on Earth, but Incendies does share some DNA strands with the sci-fi epic. For starters, Arrakis, the planet, which is exploited for its spice deposits, is meant to be an overt parallel to the Middle East and the repeated plundering of the area for petroleum deposits. Also, Dune borrows direct phrases and ideas from Arabic, and the Fremen society (the native population of Arrakis that eventually begins to look to the main character, Paul Atreides, as a messiah) shares some surface-level similarities to the belief structure of Islam. Incendies shows that Villenueve can ground a story amidst a tumultuous political and social climate and treat those events with gravitas and weight.

Released back in 2013, audiences at the time had no idea that they were watching performances from a collection of past and future comic book movie stars, with the movie's cast including Hugh Jackman, Jake Gyllenhaal, Viola Davis, Terrence Howard, and Paul Dano. Prisoners is a harrowing, terrifying, yet ultimately hopeful kidnapping thriller that revolves around the disappearance of two young girls in Pennsylvania and the efforts made by local police to find them. However, discontented with the state of the investigation as well as the release of a prime suspect, the father of one of the girls decides to take matters into his own hands, spiraling down a self-destructive path of vengeance and vigilantism.

Related: Why Dune's First Look Images Are So Controversial (Is It Fun?)

In the world of Dune, many characters defy traditional protagonist and antagonist labels. Avoiding major spoilers, the journey of young Paul Atreides is filled with shocking betrayals, but more often than not, this treachery comes out of a place of desperation or as a means to an end. Paul himself even teeters the line between hero and villain, as his crusade across Arrakis begins to warp perceptions of him from human to messiah. Prisoners is essentially proof that Villenueve can handle nuanced characters with complex motivations and objectives.

With a star-powered ensemble cast featuring the likes of Emily Blunt, Josh Brolin (who's also in Dune), and a disturbingly ruthless Benecio del Toro, there's no wonder why Sicario was nominated for three Academy Awards. The action-thriller follows Emily Blunt as a morally righteous FBI agent who's faced with the stark gray corruption of the American War on Drugs after being enlisted into a black-ops task force designated to bring down the brutal head of a Mexican drug cartel. Aside from tackling the shady and often extralegal tactics used by the United States government in their crusade against the drug trade, the movie also spends time showcasing the gendered treatment received by Blunt's character as she forays deeper into a world made and inhabited entirely by morally bankrupt men.

Sicario offers a lot in terms of how Villenueve's style might work in Dune. For starters, Sicario's action sequences are exceptionally staged, managing to be tense and unpredictable while also captivating. Dune's action, of course, will be far removed from the grounded gunfights Sicario masters, but it's evidence that the filmmaker can handle action while keeping it realistic and character-driven. Sicario also centers the experience of Emily Blunt's character as she navigates a male-dominated world, something that many of the female characters within the world of Dune can relate to. Villenueve and members of the cast have already talked at length about how the source material's treatment of its female characters is being updated and contemporized, and with Villenueve, they're more than likely in good hands.

Villenueve's first foray into science fiction started his trend of adaptations and revisitations, as Arrival was actually based on the short story Story of Your Life by American science-fiction writer Ted Chiang. Starring Jeremy Renner and Amy Adams as the two leads, Arrival revolves around linguist Louise Banks as she's recruited by the US government to translate the language of an alien species that has settled in floating space-crafts all across the globe. As the situation heats up and other nations begin to succumb to paranoia and warmongering, Louise desperately attempts to make contact with the visitors and discovers the truth of the reason why they're there.

Related: 2020 Is The Best Year For Sci-Fi Movies In Ages

A big part of Arrival's conflict is the lack of cooperation engineered by the structure of government bureaucracy. If each nation on planet Earth can work together, then their attempts to solve the mystery of the heptapod language would be much swifter and more effective. Similar to this is the constant political scheming and plotting of the different Houses within Dune's Imperium, choosing to feud with one another instead of working together. Arrival shows that Villenueve understands the shortcomings and failings of a fractured political system.

Thirty-five years in the making, the Blade Runner sequel was heavily debated before the movie was released in theaters. Some felt that it would be a cash grab; others thought that it was far too late and any interest in the franchise IP had deflated. However, Denis Villenueve's bold and daring vision of the Blade Runner universe, set 30 years after the ending of the first film, was not only visually stunning, but a complex and thematically rich examination of those deemed "secondary citizens" by society. Blade Runner 2049's narrative is about K, a replicant-turned-Blade Runner, who slowly begins to unravel a grand conspiracy that threatens the entire hierarchy of the human world.

Blade Runner 2049 was a massive undertaking, as the original film has such a huge influence in science fiction and a massive fanbase. Villenueve knew that he had to craft a story and a presentation that would captivate original fans of the material, while also bringing in new ones. Dune presents that same opportunity. Villenueve has shown that he's capable of tackling difficult subject matter across a wide range of different genres and cinematic styles, and if he manages to bring all those influences to Dune, then there's no doubt that this will be the greatest adaptation of the property ever put to screen.

More: The Biggest Box Office Risks Of 2020

What Denis Villenueve’s Previous Movies Reveal About Dune

0

Denis Villenueve's long-awaited adaptation of Frank Herbert's hugely influential science fiction epic Dune is still set to come out in December 2020 in spite of a wave of film delays in the face of the coronavirus epidemic, and his previous films may provide insight into what he has in store for the film. Dune, just one of dozens of science fictions works created by prolific American author Frank Herbert, follows the political and religious struggles on Arrakis, a barren and inhospitable desert planet that serves as the only source of melange, a spice-like substance that provides extended life and psychic abilities, among other properties. The novel's complex examination of gender roles, hero worship, imperialism, and religious dogma made it a massive success upon release in 1965, winning several awards including the Nebula as well as tying for the Hugo. Dune's influence is still felt over five decades after its release and can be seen in Star Wars, Alien, the successful Warhammer 40k series, and many others.

Previous adaptations of Dune have varied from the incomplete to the critically panned. Notoriously eccentric filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky began work on a 14-hour "re-imagining" of the source material in 1975, but funding dried up for the project before it could be completed. David Lynch also tried his hand at the so-called "unfilmable" novel, but the result was a maligned 1984 film that took major liberties with the material and veered in the direction of camp, and Lynch removed his name from some cuts of the film. Last, in 2000, the Sci-Fi Channel released a three-part miniseries starring William Hurt and Alec Newman. Rumors of a contemporary theatrical adaptation have been circling for as long as 2008, but nothing concrete solidified until February 1, 2017, when Frank Herbert's son Brian confirmed that a new adaptation was in place - a two-part saga directed by Denis Villenueve.

Related: Dune Cast Guide: Who Every Character Is In Villenueve's Sci-Fi Movie

Villenueve has discussed at length his admiration for the source material, as well as his plans for honoring Dune while also updating some of its more dated elements. The French-Canadian director has had an acclaimed career in the 22 years he's been active, directing a wide variety of projects in different genres. These films can all provide some context for what Villenueve's adaptation of Dune will look like and give fans a little more to be excited about come December.

While not his first film, Villenueve's Incendies (based on a 2003 play) is without a doubt one of his most complex, following two Canadian twins who decide to visit an unknown country in the Middle East, the birthplace of their Arab mother, at her behest. Standing in the way of their journey, however, is a bloody civil war that slowly begins to reveal the haunting tragedies that shaped their mother into the woman they knew. Officially released on September 17, 2010, the movie received critical acclaim from reviewers and was nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the 83rd Academy Awards.

Dune, of course, does not take place on Earth, but Incendies does share some DNA strands with the sci-fi epic. For starters, Arrakis, the planet, which is exploited for its spice deposits, is meant to be an overt parallel to the Middle East and the repeated plundering of the area for petroleum deposits. Also, Dune borrows direct phrases and ideas from Arabic, and the Fremen society (the native population of Arrakis that eventually begins to look to the main character, Paul Atreides, as a messiah) shares some surface-level similarities to the belief structure of Islam. Incendies shows that Villenueve can ground a story amidst a tumultuous political and social climate and treat those events with gravitas and weight.

Released back in 2013, audiences at the time had no idea that they were watching performances from a collection of past and future comic book movie stars, with the movie's cast including Hugh Jackman, Jake Gyllenhaal, Viola Davis, Terrence Howard, and Paul Dano. Prisoners is a harrowing, terrifying, yet ultimately hopeful kidnapping thriller that revolves around the disappearance of two young girls in Pennsylvania and the efforts made by local police to find them. However, discontented with the state of the investigation as well as the release of a prime suspect, the father of one of the girls decides to take matters into his own hands, spiraling down a self-destructive path of vengeance and vigilantism.

Related: Why Dune's First Look Images Are So Controversial (Is It Fun?)

In the world of Dune, many characters defy traditional protagonist and antagonist labels. Avoiding major spoilers, the journey of young Paul Atreides is filled with shocking betrayals, but more often than not, this treachery comes out of a place of desperation or as a means to an end. Paul himself even teeters the line between hero and villain, as his crusade across Arrakis begins to warp perceptions of him from human to messiah. Prisoners is essentially proof that Villenueve can handle nuanced characters with complex motivations and objectives.

With a star-powered ensemble cast featuring the likes of Emily Blunt, Josh Brolin (who's also in Dune), and a disturbingly ruthless Benecio del Toro, there's no wonder why Sicario was nominated for three Academy Awards. The action-thriller follows Emily Blunt as a morally righteous FBI agent who's faced with the stark gray corruption of the American War on Drugs after being enlisted into a black-ops task force designated to bring down the brutal head of a Mexican drug cartel. Aside from tackling the shady and often extralegal tactics used by the United States government in their crusade against the drug trade, the movie also spends time showcasing the gendered treatment received by Blunt's character as she forays deeper into a world made and inhabited entirely by morally bankrupt men.

Sicario offers a lot in terms of how Villenueve's style might work in Dune. For starters, Sicario's action sequences are exceptionally staged, managing to be tense and unpredictable while also captivating. Dune's action, of course, will be far removed from the grounded gunfights Sicario masters, but it's evidence that the filmmaker can handle action while keeping it realistic and character-driven. Sicario also centers the experience of Emily Blunt's character as she navigates a male-dominated world, something that many of the female characters within the world of Dune can relate to. Villenueve and members of the cast have already talked at length about how the source material's treatment of its female characters is being updated and contemporized, and with Villenueve, they're more than likely in good hands.

Villenueve's first foray into science fiction started his trend of adaptations and revisitations, as Arrival was actually based on the short story Story of Your Life by American science-fiction writer Ted Chiang. Starring Jeremy Renner and Amy Adams as the two leads, Arrival revolves around linguist Louise Banks as she's recruited by the US government to translate the language of an alien species that has settled in floating space-crafts all across the globe. As the situation heats up and other nations begin to succumb to paranoia and warmongering, Louise desperately attempts to make contact with the visitors and discovers the truth of the reason why they're there.

Related: 2020 Is The Best Year For Sci-Fi Movies In Ages

A big part of Arrival's conflict is the lack of cooperation engineered by the structure of government bureaucracy. If each nation on planet Earth can work together, then their attempts to solve the mystery of the heptapod language would be much swifter and more effective. Similar to this is the constant political scheming and plotting of the different Houses within Dune's Imperium, choosing to feud with one another instead of working together. Arrival shows that Villenueve understands the shortcomings and failings of a fractured political system.

Thirty-five years in the making, the Blade Runner sequel was heavily debated before the movie was released in theaters. Some felt that it would be a cash grab; others thought that it was far too late and any interest in the franchise IP had deflated. However, Denis Villenueve's bold and daring vision of the Blade Runner universe, set 30 years after the ending of the first film, was not only visually stunning, but a complex and thematically rich examination of those deemed "secondary citizens" by society. Blade Runner 2049's narrative is about K, a replicant-turned-Blade Runner, who slowly begins to unravel a grand conspiracy that threatens the entire hierarchy of the human world.

Blade Runner 2049 was a massive undertaking, as the original film has such a huge influence in science fiction and a massive fanbase. Villenueve knew that he had to craft a story and a presentation that would captivate original fans of the material, while also bringing in new ones. Dune presents that same opportunity. Villenueve has shown that he's capable of tackling difficult subject matter across a wide range of different genres and cinematic styles, and if he manages to bring all those influences to Dune, then there's no doubt that this will be the greatest adaptation of the property ever put to screen.

More: The Biggest Box Office Risks Of 2020

The Batman Addresses Bruce Wayne’s Billionaire Status In Today’s Context

0

Matt Reeves, the director of The Batman, addresses Bruce Wayne's billionaire status in today's context. The Batman is the upcoming DC superhero movie starring Robert Pattinson. Pattinson will be replacing Ben Affleck, who portrayed the titular role in Justice League in 2017. The film will serve as a reboot to the film franchise about the caped crusader. The cast includes Zoë Kravitz as Selina Kyle/Catwoman, Paul Dano as Edward Nashton/Riddler, Jeffrey Wright as James Gordon, and Andy Serkis as Alfred Pennyworth. The movie will be a part of the DC Extended Universe.

Batman is one of the most recognized and iconic comic book heroes of all time. The masked crime fighter made his debut in Detective Comics #27 in 1939. Since then, the hero has been portrayed by a long list of actors through different mediums. Before Pattinson, the character was most recently played by Ben Affleck and Christian Bale. Batman's alter ego is, of course, Bruce Wayne, a wealthy playboy-billionaire and philanthropist who owns Wayne Enterprises. His wealth and resources assist him in his crime-fighting mission, providing him the necessary tools, weapons, and gadgets to bring down the criminal underworld. Wayne wasn't always a billionaire. It wasn't until 1994's Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight #61 when he first received the billionaire status in a story. Despite his place in the top 0.0001% of society, fans have still been able to relate to the character and follow his stories.

Related: How The Batman Could Set Up Arthur Fleck's Joker In Its Post-Credits

During an interview with The Daily Beast, director Matt Reeves discussed the upcoming movie and talked about how a billionaire superhero still works today. Reeves was asked about Batman being rooted in sociopolitical issues, and whether or not it is difficult to make a billionaire superhero work. Reeves responded, "To me, that’s the joy of working with it. You use those surface elements of it, and you explore them in a way that, I feel, they haven’t been explored yet." Reeves mentioned that every director who helmed a Batman movie had their particular take on it. He did not want to do just another Batman movie, but rather, do one where he is allowed to explore ideas that matter to him.

Reeves followed by stating that The Batman will be made in the context of today. "It’s like any great tale that you can keep revisiting though the context of the times, and also through the context of human experience, and find new ways to come at the character that illuminates something that’s meaningful to you, and hopefully meaningful to an audience."

While fans are undoubtedly eager to see what sort of choices Reeves ultimately makes with the movie, they may have to wait a bit longer. While The Batman was initially scheduled for a June 25, 2021 release date, production on the film has been shut down indefinitely due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The movie may fall victim to a complete overhaul, in terms of when it finally hits theaters. However, there is still the chance that the film is released on time, depending on how the current worldwide crisis pans out.

Next: Tim Burton's Original Batman Returns Had A Weird Penguin & Catwoman Team-Up

Source: The Daily Beast

Go to Top