Archive for May 20, 2020

Dungeons & Dragons Once Had A Random Encounter Table For Harlots

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The Dungeons & Dragons books contain a lot of random encounter tables in order for Dungeon Masters to surprise the player, and they certainly would be shocked if a roll was ever made on the Harlot table from the original Dungeon Master's Guide. 

It's a common misconception about Dungeons & Dragons that the game is enjoyed exclusively by men. Dungeons & Dragons certainly had a boy's club attitude in the early days of the hobby, which was reflected in a lot of the fanservice-y depictions of female characters & monsters, but a lot of women have enjoyed the game throughout its history. Dungeons & Dragons had its best-ever year of sales in 2019, and Wizards of the Coast has revealed that women now make up 39% of the fanbase of the game.

Related: D&D Accidentally Stole A Race From The Creator Of Game Of Thrones

The creators of Dungeons & Dragons started to make the game more inclusive with the third edition of the game, but some of the older books have questionable content which wouldn't be part of the modern D&D titles. In 1979, Dungeons & Dragons co-creator Gary Gygax penned the first-ever Dungeon Master's Guide for Advanced Dungeons & Dragons, which contained a number of random tables that a Dungeon Master could consult if they need some content on the spot. These charts were helpful for a beginner DM who was new to Dungeons & Dragons. The most infamous chart can be found on page one hundred and ninety-two, where the reader will find the random encounter table for harlots.

All it takes is two D10s for the Dungeon Master to determine which lady of the evening the party encounters when exploring a city. What makes this chart so amusing in hindsight is how later editions of the game worked so hard to scrub elements of sex and violence from the lore, as the owners were facing outside pressure from groups that were accusing the game of promoting Satanism.

Dungeons & Dragons faced a number of controversies over the years, but those were mostly from outside influences or legal problems. There was a lot of discussion about representation and sexism present within the text of the game, but those were from within the fanbase. Dungeons & Dragons players, for the most part, just roll their eyes whenever they see a chart like this, considering how early it was included in the game and the different social attitudes of the time. There are even some who use the chart whenever they purchase a new set of D10s to see how high/low they roll. The Harlot table is just an early curio from the days when the game was still finding its feet and the developers weren't quite clued in as to the audience they would attract in the future.

Next: How To Best Play (Tabletop) Dungeons & Dragons Online

Vanderpump Rules: Kristen Doute Details Jax Taylor Affair in New Book

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Vanderpump Rules' Kristen Doute wrote a chapter in her new book about her Jax Taylor affair. She wanted to make sure viewers understood where her head was at during that difficult time.

The loveable klutz of Vanderpump Rules has been redeeming herself ever since her out-of-control antics sideswiped her way to a long career working for Lisa Vanderpump. Doute has been fighting an uphill battle to win back her friends and viewers after years of heated outbursts. In the current season, fans watched as Jax Taylor and Brittany Cartwright tied the knot while the witches of We-Ho have called in quits on their friendship.

Related: Kristin Cavallari Quits Her Reality Show Very Cavallari amid Divorce from Jay Cutler

Doute has had a rough couple of seasons but currently has won back the hearts of her supporters. She tried her best to be the voice of reason when opportunities for her to flip out arose and tried with all her might to save her friendship with Stassi Schroeder and Katie Maloney. The two ladies have been acting like mean girls all season to Doute and on last night’s episode, she had enough, walking away from their friendship.

The reality star is getting ready to release her new book and she wanted to give Cartwright a heads up about a specific chapter that involved her husband, Jax Taylor. The book will be entitled "He’s Making You Crazy" and will dish on all the hot gossip that fans have watched for seasons. Taylor recently found out thanks to US Weekly that there will be an entire chapter dedicated to him called ‘I Lied.’ For Doute, this chapter was particularly hard to write as it was obvious who she was writing about. Even though the author does not say names fans are well aware of the incident. Doute still harbors immense guilt as it was the straw that broke the camel’s back for her friendship with Schroeder. The famed incident took place during season 2 when she finally admitted to Tom Sandoval and Schroeder that the two had an affair.

Even though parts of the book were hard to write, the reality star is looking forward to readers hearing her side of the story as she is immensely proud of her work. Many noted a change in the Bravo personality as she has grown up into a self-aware woman and does not seem to want to go back to the woman scorned.

Next: RHOA: Nene Leakes Says of Possible Return, 'It's Too Much'

Source: Us Weekly

Evidence of a Parallel Universe Where Time Runs Backward Detected by NASA Scientists

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Scientists at NASA have reportedly uncovered a bizarre parallel universe where the rules of physics and time are operating in reverse.

Why Patton Oswalt Avoids Donald Trump Jokes in Netflix Special

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Comedian Patton Oswalt jokes about life and American culture in I Love Everything, but mostly stays away from Donald Trump bits in the 2020 Netflix special. There's a method to the stand-up madness, however, and it connects directly to Oswalt's revised life perspective after a rough couple of years. Directed by Marcus Raboy, I Love Everything released on Netflix in May 2020.

Oswalt initially rose to fame by portraying Spence Olchin in CBS' King of Queens. By 2005, he married journalist Michelle McNamara, and hadn't starred in a comedy special since 1999. Over the next several years, though, Oswalt's movie and television career picked up, and he was able to display his observational humor in five stand-up specials over the course of a decade. Sadly, Michelle passed away suddenly in April 2016 due to heart failure. That same month, Netflix released the standup special Patton Oswalt: Talking for Clapping. Since then, his comedic approach has changed for obvious reasons, certainly after the election of Trump.

Related: Chris D'Elia Attacks Outrage Culture In His Netflix Special, No Pain

Whereas Oswalt's 2017 special Annihilation begins with an extensive Trump commentary and builds to personal reveals, his 2020 special is structurally reversed. In I Love Everything, the show commences with Oswalt discussing his 50th birthday, followed by a sequence about his 2017 marriage to Meredith Salenger, "a poem of a woman." By the 37-minute mark in the Netflix special, Oswalt references the current American president for the first time, stating "I don't really have any current event stuff or... I don't have any Trump material is what I'm saying." After a couple moments of collecting his thoughts and gauging the audience's reaction, Oswalt explains the reason for his lack of Trump jokes: "What is the point at this point?"

According to Patton Oswalt in I Love Everything, he now avoids Trump humor because it's impossible to "effect change." He states that Trump supporters are "lost" and that many people "hate" the current President, so any jokes during a 2020 stand-up special no longer have the same impact upon audiences. From the comedian's perspective, he compares the concept to speaking with Charles Manson followers and hoping they'll have an open-minded response to comedic material. Oswalt also reflects about friends who once told him that it would be "Christmas every day" during Trump's Presidency, and then transitions to a metaphorical comparison about an 18-wheeler full of monkeys and PCP that crashed into "a train full of diarrhea." And so the complex, according to Oswalt in the Netflix standup special, is that modern American culture is so entertaining that people would rather watch the circus instead of listening to someone joke about the circus.

Unlike comedians who stay on brand with predictable humor and commentaries about outrage culture, Oswalt strays from the script in I Love Everything. One could argue that he's more cynical in 2020, however the main focus of the 2020 special - aging and being a father - implies that Oswalt's priorities have shifted, and that he's less interested in catering to audience's expectations, much like Jerry Seinfeld in the recent Netflix special 23 Hours to Live. Still, the title alone in I Love Everything suggests that Oswalt is still an optimist, one who understands that surviving "a catastrophic twist of fate" can provide a sense of clarity when thinking about the future.

More: How Netflix Comedian Bert Kreischer Inspired the Van Wilder Movie Franchise

Why Patton Oswalt Avoids Donald Trump Jokes in Netflix Special

0

Comedian Patton Oswalt jokes about life and American culture in I Love Everything, but mostly stays away from Donald Trump bits in the 2020 Netflix special. There's a method to the stand-up madness, however, and it connects directly to Oswalt's revised life perspective after a rough couple of years. Directed by Marcus Raboy, I Love Everything released on Netflix in May 2020.

Oswalt initially rose to fame by portraying Spence Olchin in CBS' King of Queens. By 2005, he married journalist Michelle McNamara, and hadn't starred in a comedy special since 1999. Over the next several years, though, Oswalt's movie and television career picked up, and he was able to display his observational humor in five stand-up specials over the course of a decade. Sadly, Michelle passed away suddenly in April 2016 due to heart failure. That same month, Netflix released the standup special Patton Oswalt: Talking for Clapping. Since then, his comedic approach has changed for obvious reasons, certainly after the election of Trump.

Related: Chris D'Elia Attacks Outrage Culture In His Netflix Special, No Pain

Whereas Oswalt's 2017 special Annihilation begins with an extensive Trump commentary and builds to personal reveals, his 2020 special is structurally reversed. In I Love Everything, the show commences with Oswalt discussing his 50th birthday, followed by a sequence about his 2017 marriage to Meredith Salenger, "a poem of a woman." By the 37-minute mark in the Netflix special, Oswalt references the current American president for the first time, stating "I don't really have any current event stuff or... I don't have any Trump material is what I'm saying." After a couple moments of collecting his thoughts and gauging the audience's reaction, Oswalt explains the reason for his lack of Trump jokes: "What is the point at this point?"

According to Patton Oswalt in I Love Everything, he now avoids Trump humor because it's impossible to "effect change." He states that Trump supporters are "lost" and that many people "hate" the current President, so any jokes during a 2020 stand-up special no longer have the same impact upon audiences. From the comedian's perspective, he compares the concept to speaking with Charles Manson followers and hoping they'll have an open-minded response to comedic material. Oswalt also reflects about friends who once told him that it would be "Christmas every day" during Trump's Presidency, and then transitions to a metaphorical comparison about an 18-wheeler full of monkeys and PCP that crashed into "a train full of diarrhea." And so the complex, according to Oswalt in the Netflix standup special, is that modern American culture is so entertaining that people would rather watch the circus instead of listening to someone joke about the circus.

Unlike comedians who stay on brand with predictable humor and commentaries about outrage culture, Oswalt strays from the script in I Love Everything. One could argue that he's more cynical in 2020, however the main focus of the 2020 special - aging and being a father - implies that Oswalt's priorities have shifted, and that he's less interested in catering to audience's expectations, much like Jerry Seinfeld in the recent Netflix special 23 Hours to Live. Still, the title alone in I Love Everything suggests that Oswalt is still an optimist, one who understands that surviving "a catastrophic twist of fate" can provide a sense of clarity when thinking about the future.

More: How Netflix Comedian Bert Kreischer Inspired the Van Wilder Movie Franchise

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