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Parks & Rec: Every Future Timeline Explained | Screen Rant

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Parks & Recreation’s final episode included different time jumps so fans could get a glimpse at the characters’ lives in the future – and here are all the timelines that were shown. Created by Greg Daniels and Michael Schur, Parks & Recreation debuted on NBC in 2009 and came to an end in 2015 after seven seasons. The series followed eternal optimist Leslie Knope (Amy Poehler) and her friends and coworkers from the Parks and Recreation Department in the fictional town of Pawnee, Indiana.

The series had a rough start but it eventually found its own voice and built a solid fanbase. The final season decided to do things slightly different and skipped two years, reuniting viewers with the characters in 2017. The Parks & Recreation finale also included time jumps that helped the writers give full closure to each character, and the episode – appropriately titled “One Last Ride” – has been regarded as one of the best TV series finales in the last years.

Related: Parks & Rec's Finale Had A Great Callback To The Pilot Episode

With some many futures it’s easy to get lost or forget where and what each character ended up doing. With that in mind, here’s every future timeline shown in the Parks & Recreation finale.

The episode begins in 2017 with the group inside the Parks Department, reminiscing their time together as some of them were ready to leave Pawnee. When a resident complains about a broken swing and asks to get it fixed, Leslie sees this as an opportunity for everyone to get together one last time to help Pawnee, and so the flash forwards showing the future of each character begin.

Craig is shown to continue working at Tom’s Bistro, where he meets Donna and Ron’s old hairdresser, Typhoon, and the two end up getting married. Tom is now married to Lucy and looks to expand his restaurant business, but fails and instead becomes a best-selling author and motivational speaker a few years later.

Andy wants to have kids, but April is reluctant. After seeking advice from Ben and Leslie, April decides she’s ready to have a family with Andy, and gives birth to a boy a year later. Meanwhile, Jean-Ralphio and his sister Mona Lisa fake their deaths to get insurance money, leave the country, and build a casino in Tajikistan – but being as loud as they have always been, they get caught. Somewhere else in Pawnee, Ron resigns from the Very Good Building Company and turns to Leslie for help, who makes him the superintendent of the Pawnee National Park, which ends up being his dream job. In 2023, Donna is shown to be living happily in Seattle with Joe (Keegan-Michael Key), and her real-estate firm to be very successful thanks to a resurgence in the housing market.

When Leslie and Ben are both approached about running for governor of Indiana, they head back to Pawnee in hopes that will help them with their decision. Once there, they stop by the Parks Department where the whole group and their respective kids have gathered to show them their support. It’s revealed that Ann and Chris had another kid and are returning to Pawnee, and April and Andy are expecting their second child. At the party, Ben announces that Leslie will be running for governor.

Leslie is shown to have become governor for two consecutive terms. She’s making a commencement speech at Indiana University, where they name the library after her... which is weird given the rivalry between the Parks Department and Pawnee’s library. There had to be some irony.

Leslie and Ben attend Garry’s funeral, who continued to be mayor of Pawnee for many, many years until his death at the age of 100. Leslie and Ben are surrounded by Secret Service members, implying that either Ben or Leslie became the President of the United States. And because Garry could never catch a break, not even when dead, his tombstone had his name misspelled. Many years into the future, Craig and Typhoon are seen celebrating their anniversary in an underwater cruise, where Jean-Ralphio’s future can also be seen.

Next: Parks & Rec Jokingly Predicted Game Of Thrones Ending

Parks & Rec: Every Future Timeline Explained | Screen Rant

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Parks & Recreation’s final episode included different time jumps so fans could get a glimpse at the characters’ lives in the future – and here are all the timelines that were shown. Created by Greg Daniels and Michael Schur, Parks & Recreation debuted on NBC in 2009 and came to an end in 2015 after seven seasons. The series followed eternal optimist Leslie Knope (Amy Poehler) and her friends and coworkers from the Parks and Recreation Department in the fictional town of Pawnee, Indiana.

The series had a rough start but it eventually found its own voice and built a solid fanbase. The final season decided to do things slightly different and skipped two years, reuniting viewers with the characters in 2017. The Parks & Recreation finale also included time jumps that helped the writers give full closure to each character, and the episode – appropriately titled “One Last Ride” – has been regarded as one of the best TV series finales in the last years.

Related: Parks & Rec's Finale Had A Great Callback To The Pilot Episode

With some many futures it’s easy to get lost or forget where and what each character ended up doing. With that in mind, here’s every future timeline shown in the Parks & Recreation finale.

The episode begins in 2017 with the group inside the Parks Department, reminiscing their time together as some of them were ready to leave Pawnee. When a resident complains about a broken swing and asks to get it fixed, Leslie sees this as an opportunity for everyone to get together one last time to help Pawnee, and so the flash forwards showing the future of each character begin.

Craig is shown to continue working at Tom’s Bistro, where he meets Donna and Ron’s old hairdresser, Typhoon, and the two end up getting married. Tom is now married to Lucy and looks to expand his restaurant business, but fails and instead becomes a best-selling author and motivational speaker a few years later.

Andy wants to have kids, but April is reluctant. After seeking advice from Ben and Leslie, April decides she’s ready to have a family with Andy, and gives birth to a boy a year later. Meanwhile, Jean-Ralphio and his sister Mona Lisa fake their deaths to get insurance money, leave the country, and build a casino in Tajikistan – but being as loud as they have always been, they get caught. Somewhere else in Pawnee, Ron resigns from the Very Good Building Company and turns to Leslie for help, who makes him the superintendent of the Pawnee National Park, which ends up being his dream job. In 2023, Donna is shown to be living happily in Seattle with Joe (Keegan-Michael Key), and her real-estate firm to be very successful thanks to a resurgence in the housing market.

When Leslie and Ben are both approached about running for governor of Indiana, they head back to Pawnee in hopes that will help them with their decision. Once there, they stop by the Parks Department where the whole group and their respective kids have gathered to show them their support. It’s revealed that Ann and Chris had another kid and are returning to Pawnee, and April and Andy are expecting their second child. At the party, Ben announces that Leslie will be running for governor.

Leslie is shown to have become governor for two consecutive terms. She’s making a commencement speech at Indiana University, where they name the library after her... which is weird given the rivalry between the Parks Department and Pawnee’s library. There had to be some irony.

Leslie and Ben attend Garry’s funeral, who continued to be mayor of Pawnee for many, many years until his death at the age of 100. Leslie and Ben are surrounded by Secret Service members, implying that either Ben or Leslie became the President of the United States. And because Garry could never catch a break, not even when dead, his tombstone had his name misspelled. Many years into the future, Craig and Typhoon are seen celebrating their anniversary in an underwater cruise, where Jean-Ralphio’s future can also be seen.

Next: Parks & Rec Jokingly Predicted Game Of Thrones Ending

Black Widow Can Give Natasha A Better Ending Than Avengers: Endgame

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Black Widow has the power of giving Natasha Romanoff a better ending than Avengers: Endgame did. The final Avengers film saw the surviving heroes bringing back those who vanished after Thanos’ snap in Avengers: Infinity War, but it also saw two beloved characters die: Iron Man and Black Widow. Tony Stark got a heroic ending that brought a satisfying (although sad) closure to his arc, but the same can’t be said about Black Widow. Natasha’s final mission was to go back in time with Hawkeye to Vormir in order to get the soul stone – but as Thanos and viewers learned in Infinity War, the stone could only be acquired by sacrificing someone they love, and Natasha sacrificed herself.

Natasha Romanoff aka Black Widow was introduced in Iron Man 2 and went on to appear in six more films: The Avengers, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Avengers: Age of Ultron, Captain America: Civil War, Avengers: Infinity War, and Avengers: Endgame. Although she was part of the original Avengers of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, she was constantly neglected by the writers, who either gave her troubling arcs that didn’t fit her (as happened in Age of Ultron) or they simply didn’t bother to develop her story. As result, her death in Avengers: Endgame has been one of the most criticized moments of the film.

Related: When Black Widow Takes Place In The MCU Timeline

Avengers: Endgame was Natasha’s final adventure, but fans will get to see her one more time in her solo film Black Widow, which will serve as a prequel as it’s set after the events of Captain America: Civil War – and hopefully, this film will give her a better ending.

In all her appearances in the MCU, viewers didn’t really get to know who Natasha Romanoff was. Age of Ultron offered a bit of backstory through the nightmare induced by Scarlet Witch, in which Natasha was seen during her assassin training at the Red Room, in Russia. It was also revealed through this vision that all those in training were forced to be sterilized, something that Natasha herself later said made her feel like a monster (and so Joss Whedon had the terrible idea of pairing her with fellow “monster”, Hulk). Her arc in Age of Ultron was really bad, so much that it was forgotten in subsequent films, but her story wasn’t explored any further. That way, Natasha’s death was perceived by many as the female character that had to sacrifice herself for the sake of a male character (even if it was to help bring back half the universe, the act was more focused on her relationship with Hawkeye), which obviously didn’t appeal to a lot of viewers. Add that Hawkeye survives explicitly because of his family and Black Widow’s sacrifice only makes her already problematic arc (or lack of it) even worse, and completely ignores that in the first part of the film she opened up to Steve Rogers and called the team her family.

It’s also unclear how her death fulfills the rules to get the Soul Stone. In Infinity War, it was clear that a person has to choose to give up the one they love, but in Natasha and Clint’s case they chose themselves, and Natasha ended up killing herself. It only makes the rules within the MCU even weirder and more flexible, which doesn’t help at all. Her death was also left aside for the rest of the film, except when the Hulk said he tried to bring her back when he undid the snap. Unlike Stark, she didn’t get a funeral or any type of ceremony, with Joe Russo justifying this by saying that she’s getting her own film and Tony isn’t. Truth is that, while Tony Stark was a bigger figure than Natasha Romanoff, she never stopped working to help others, not even in the five years between killing Thanos and undoing the snap, while Tony did get a break from superhero life even before that. Taking that into account along with the underdevelopment of the character, both her death and lack of funeral felt like a disservice to her, and her sacrifice ended up being nothing more than a plot device.

Black Widow is the MCU’s final chance to show viewers who Natasha Romanoff really was, where she came from, and what her motivations were. The film will follow Natasha as she’s on the run from authorities following the events of Civil War and reunites with people from her past, specifically Yelena Belova (Florence Pugh), Alexei Shostakov aka Red Guardian (David Harbour), and Melina (Rachel Weisz). The first trailer for Black Widow didn’t give away any plot details, but it’s heavily implied that the film will explore the Red Room (both as part of her past and the operations of this place at that moment), which will help the audience know and understand her character better.

Related: Black Widow Trailer Breakdown: 23 Story Details & Secrets You Missed

Black Widow can give fans a glimpse at her transformation from Russian assassin to hero, how and why her motivations changed, and the basis of what drove her to sacrifice herself to save humanity. Although none of the Avengers are set to appear, the film can also explore her ties to the team, especially Hawkeye, justifying in the process why her sacrifice counted as a “love” one per the Soul Stone rules – and fans have been waiting for an explanation on the famous Budapest mission, so it’s now or never. As mentioned above, Black Widow had zero consistency throughout her appearances in the MCU, and her solo film is the last opportunity to give her a full hero arc that can help create some cohesion with her past appearances (and future, as Infinity War and Endgame are set after it), as well as justify her death.

Avengers: Endgame was Natasha’s final mission, but Black Widow is her final film, no matter if it's a prequel. As such, it has the power of giving Natasha a better ending that can impact her character’s death and change the general opinion and perception of it. Of course, how this will happen is a mystery, but a couple of theories and ideas have come out from what is known so far about the film’s plot. Black Widow will presumably end with Natasha reuniting with Steve Rogers, as by the time Avengers: Infinity War began they were already working together again. Why she made the choice to go back, keep fighting, and be a hero can depend on many things, but her Russian family might have something to do with it. If that’s the case, it would bring so much more to her arc than any of her previous appearances did, and would give her Endgame death an emotional background.

Black Widow’s death won’t change, but the events that happened before it and that drove Natasha to do what she did can turn it around and give it actual meaning. In addition to that, Black Widow can (and hopefully will) do justice to the character by properly exploring and developing her story – something that should have happened a long time ago, but better late than never.

Next: How One Marvel Comic Remade Black Widow For The MCU

Black Christmas Utterly Betrays The Original Movie | Screen Rant

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Black Christmas is ostensibly a remake of a horror classic, but the film has so little in common with the original, it might as well be brand new. A common complaint levied at remakes is sticking too closely to the original film, a trait that remakes like The Omen, Psycho, and Carrie take to extremes, almost being carbon copies of their predecessors. On the other hand, a remake that strays too far from the original can also earn hate for not providing more of what the fans liked the first time. It's a balancing act, and many remakes fail to pull it off.

Judging by the negative critical reviews and lukewarm fan response so far, Black Christmas 2019 won't become one of the few horror remakes that fans consider at or near the league of the original, such as Dawn of the Dead 2004 or The Hills Have Eyes 2006. Black Christmas looks destined to be forgotten fairly quickly, and fade into obscurity over a short period.

Related: Best Christmas Horror Movies

That's not to say that the film is worthless, as Black Christmas 2019 boasts a terrific lead performance by Imogen Poots, a likeable main cast, and some timely commentary about the #MeToo movement and rape culture in general. The problem is all those messages get lost among the cliched, underwhelming horror film surrounding it. When it comes to being a remake of Black Christmas though, Blumhouse's film performs even worse.

Black Christmas starts out with a decent amount of promise as a movie, but never once does it live up to the Black Christmas name and reputation. The original Black Christmas is a horror landmark, and a grandfather to the entire slasher genre. Black Christmas 2019 doesn't retain the original's mysterious killer, drops the lurid phone calls for laughable attempts to make text messages scary, and introduces supernatural elements into the plot that not only make the story more convoluted but also render the scenario laughable. In addition, its PG-13 rating prevents any of the colorful language used by the sorority sisters in the original film, and reduces all the kills to bloodless boredom.

By the time a gang of sorority sisters arrives at the AKO frat house with weapons like crossbows and a menorah for a mass brawl with a bunch of hooded, black magic goo-powered frat bros that would be at home on a professional wrestling card, Black Christmas 2019 has strayed so far from the spirit of its namesake that it's barely even a horror film at all. This lends the film the air of a cynical cash grab, as if those behind Black Christmas 2019 wanted to tell an entirely new story, but weren't confident it would be successful without piggybacking on an established brand. There's more than enough room for a horror film with a feminist edge on the cinematic landscape, but the concept deserves better than Black Christmas, and so does the original Bob Clark-directed classic. In the end, Black Christmas 2019 is less like a yuletide treat and more like a lump of coal in one's stocking.

More: Black Christmas Inspired John Carpenter's Original Halloween

Umbrella Academy Risks Repeating Stranger Things’ Worst Mistake

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Stranger Things divided fans with one particularly controversial episode in its second season, and The Umbrella Academy will need to avoid the same problems. Even before Stranger Things' "The Lost Sister" episode, fans already knew that Eleven wasn't the only child subjected to Brenner's cruel experiments, but there had been no sign of these missing kids previously in the present-day. In a jarring change of pace, Eleven meets up with Kali in Chicago and the two "sisters" embark on a revenge mission along with Kali's misfit street gang. Eleven returns home after a disagreement with Kali and their story is left unresolved, but the thread has yet to be picked back up.

This may be because "The Lost Sister" was a widely-criticized installment of a series that has generally been a critical darling. Both critics and Stranger Things fans complained that the abrupt shift in tone and style didn't serve the episode well, while the plot failed to significantly expand on the established story or world of Stranger Things 2. Many felt that the standalone episode halted the overall momentum of the season, while Kali, the only other super-powered kid in the series so far, was left as a one-dimensional plot device, rather than a properly fleshed out entity. It's generally accepted that "The Lost Sister" wasted the opportunity for Stranger Things to introduce its hidden super-powered characters and The Umbrella Academy has a similar dilemma on its hands for season 2.

Related: The Umbrella Academy Theory: Ben Isn't Really Dead (& Will Be Brought Back)

In the premise of The Umbrella Academy, 43 women give birth under strange circumstances, resulting in children who possess superhuman abilities. Thus far, only the central 7 academy members have actually appeared in the series, leaving around 30 others (give or take, accounting for twins and such) out in the world with powers of some description. However, there has been no indication that any of the other children have used their powers to gain notoriety in the same way that Reginald Hargreeves did with the Academy, implying that all of the others are either hiding or unaware of their true power.

As with Stranger Things, there's an unwritten expectation that the mystery behind these unseen super-powered kids will be addressed at some point. Also like Stranger Things, however, The Umbrella Academy has its own central story to deal with that doesn't necessarily make room for the introduction of the other 30-odd kids dotted around the world that Hargreeves wasn't able to buy. This makes the quirky series susceptible to the same mistakes made by "The Lost Sister."

Perhaps the biggest lesson The Umbrella Academy can learn is to integrate any future super-powered characters into the main plot, rather than moving them to a standalone episode in a completely fresh setting. Doing so will ensure any future special characters feel vital, rather than the peripheral figure Kali ended up becoming in Stranger Things. A role in the main plot would also prevent viewers seeing the new characters as a detour or a distraction from The Umbrella Academy season 2's main journey, which will undoubtedly be preventing Vanya causing the apocalypse.

The second major pitfall to avoid is using the other super-powered characters in the world of The Umbrella Academy merely to help trigger plot development among the main cast, and then discarding them when that purpose is fulfilled. Part of what most Stranger Things fans didn't enjoy about Kali was her single-use purpose as someone who pushed Eleven's darker tendencies. This certainly won't be what The Umbrella Academy's audience will be looking for when other super-powered characters inevitably arrive. These figures should have as much light and shade as the likes of Vanya and Allison do, with distinct tragic backstories that inform their moral alignment in the present.

More: Why The Umbrella Academy's 2019 Doesn't Have Cellphones

The Umbrella Academy season 2 premieres in 2020 on Netflix. Stranger Things 4 is currently without a release date.

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