TV News

Supergirl Reveals What Really Killed The Dinosaurs In The Arrowverse

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Warning: SPOILERS ahead for Supergirl, season 5, episode 7, "Tremors".

Supergirl revealed that the mysterious group known as Leviathan was responsible for killing off the dinosaurs on Earth-38 in the Arrowverse. The episode also revealed the organization's alien origins and their strange connection to a sister planet of Krypton.

When the name of Leviathan was first dropped in Supergirl's season 4 finale, it was something of a shock to comics fans. While the terrorist organization came to be a major part of the Superman family of comics' storyline over the past year, very little had been firmly established about the group beyond their name and their extensive connections. Indeed, it was not until this past week that the origins of Leviathan in the comics were explained and the leader of Leviathan's true identity was revealed.

Related: Who is Acrata? Supergirl Villain's Comic Origins & Powers Explained

The Leviathan group presented in Supergirl season 5, episode 7, "Tremors" is quite different, being established as an alien organization with a history spanning back beyond the early days of Man. This is explained in an early scene, which introduces the character of Rama Khan; one of five aliens from the planet Jarhanpur, who traveled to Earth thousands of years earlier. While chastising an underling, Rama Khan speaks of how his people have been guarding the Earth "since our ship, as big as an asteroid, wiped out the dinosaurs."

The brief scene explains something of Leviathan's organization and goals, as we see Rama Khan debate with Gamemnae, another member of the organization. Khan seems to prefer a fire-and-brimstone approach to managing humanity, arranging great disasters that decimate major population centers, claiming that "the rising of oceans and the raging of rivers will always work." Later in the episode, Brainiac-5 identifies Rama Khan as being responsible for several famous historical disasters, such as the volcanic eruption at Pompeii, the Yellow River flood of 1887, the Bhola Cyclone and the Antioch Earthquake. By contrast, Gamemnae seems to prefer the carrot to the stick and offers the use of her technology to Rama Khan for a peaceful solution.

Strangely enough, the characters of Rama Khan and Gamemnae are taken directly from the comics, but they are not entirely similar to the characters we see in "Tremors." The two villains were originally part of a council known as the League of Ancients, who were a sort of proto-Justice League made up of heroes formed in the year 1020 BC. The League of Ancients, however, was made up of magicians rather than aliens.

Regardless, the revelation that Leviathan is made up of aliens secretly ruling the world does explain many of the mysteries regarding the group. Chief among theses is why they sought to manipulate Lex Luthor  and Lena Luthor through Eve Teschmacher rather than recruit them directly. Ignoring the classic Luthor stubbornness, there is no way either of them would bow to any group of alien overlords, even if it did give them a chance to destroy Supergirl. It remains to be seen, however, if the events of this season will see if Kryptonians go the way of the dinosaurs.

Next: Arrowverse's Superman Spinoff Already Has A Story Problem

Goliath’s Season 2 Finale: Sometimes The Bad Guys Win

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Goliath's season 2 finale showed that sometime's the good guys don't get to win. Amazon has been killing it with great original shows, thanks to the likes of The Boys or The Man in the High Castle. Goliath joined those ranks in 2016, with the series being a mature legal drama co-created by Jonathan Shapiro and David E. Kelley. The first season introduced Billy McBride (Billy Bob Thornton, Fargo), a former high-flying lawyer who was fired from a law firm he helped establish and became an alcoholic.

Goliath season 1 revolved around Billy becoming involved in a case against his old firm and eventually emerging victorious by the end of the series. The show received great reviews for being a legal drama that injected a little freshness into the well-travelled subgenre, and for Thorton's lead performance. Billy may have scored a hard-won victory, but the first season was still a dark ride, and season 2 would dial that up a few notches.

Related: Goliath Season 3 Review: Billy Bob Thornton Heads To The Desert For One Strange Trip

Goliath season 2 would also receive a mixed reaction, with those who enjoyed the grounded tone of the original series feeling it strayed too far into some weird areas. The setup of the second season has Billy hitting the bottle pretty hard until he's asked by his friend Oscar (Lou Diamond Philips, Young Guns) to defend his son Julio against a double murder charge. This leads Billy to mayoral candidate and Oscar's friend Marisol Silva (Ana de la Reguera). Billy starts romancing Silva and takes the case after Oscar is murdered.

By the time Goliath's season 2 finale comes around, things have gone pretty bad. Julio was murdered in prison, its discovered Marisol is the sister of a vicious Mexican cartel leader called Gabriel and Billy has made an enemy of creepy developer Tom Wyatt (Mark Duplass, Tully). This all comes to a bitter conclusion in season 2, with Billy getting one of Tom's associates to flip on him; Tom responds by letting Billy know Marisol was involved in Julio's death. The season ends pretty badly for Tom though, with the cartel kidnapping him and Gabriel amputating his arms and legs, and finally, his tongue.

Billy faces Marisol after she's elected Mayor about her involvement with Julio's death and her various misdeeds. He's fallen in love with her by this point, but she tearfully breaks it off and claims she never had feelings for him. Goliath season 2 ends with Billy having essentially lost, with Gabriel and Marisol walking away, and while Tom Wyatt met a nasty fate, he was far from the only one with blood on his hands. The second season was in many ways messier than Goliath season 1, but the darkness of the season 2 finale was a bold move.

Next: What To Expect From The Boys Season 2

Goliath’s Season 2 Finale: Sometimes The Bad Guys Win

0

Goliath's season 2 finale showed that sometime's the good guys don't get to win. Amazon has been killing it with great original shows, thanks to the likes of The Boys or The Man in the High Castle. Goliath joined those ranks in 2016, with the series being a mature legal drama co-created by Jonathan Shapiro and David E. Kelley. The first season introduced Billy McBride (Billy Bob Thornton, Fargo), a former high-flying lawyer who was fired from a law firm he helped establish and became an alcoholic.

Goliath season 1 revolved around Billy becoming involved in a case against his old firm and eventually emerging victorious by the end of the series. The show received great reviews for being a legal drama that injected a little freshness into the well-travelled subgenre, and for Thorton's lead performance. Billy may have scored a hard-won victory, but the first season was still a dark ride, and season 2 would dial that up a few notches.

Related: Goliath Season 3 Review: Billy Bob Thornton Heads To The Desert For One Strange Trip

Goliath season 2 would also receive a mixed reaction, with those who enjoyed the grounded tone of the original series feeling it strayed too far into some weird areas. The setup of the second season has Billy hitting the bottle pretty hard until he's asked by his friend Oscar (Lou Diamond Philips, Young Guns) to defend his son Julio against a double murder charge. This leads Billy to mayoral candidate and Oscar's friend Marisol Silva (Ana de la Reguera). Billy starts romancing Silva and takes the case after Oscar is murdered.

By the time Goliath's season 2 finale comes around, things have gone pretty bad. Julio was murdered in prison, its discovered Marisol is the sister of a vicious Mexican cartel leader called Gabriel and Billy has made an enemy of creepy developer Tom Wyatt (Mark Duplass, Tully). This all comes to a bitter conclusion in season 2, with Billy getting one of Tom's associates to flip on him; Tom responds by letting Billy know Marisol was involved in Julio's death. The season ends pretty badly for Tom though, with the cartel kidnapping him and Gabriel amputating his arms and legs, and finally, his tongue.

Billy faces Marisol after she's elected Mayor about her involvement with Julio's death and her various misdeeds. He's fallen in love with her by this point, but she tearfully breaks it off and claims she never had feelings for him. Goliath season 2 ends with Billy having essentially lost, with Gabriel and Marisol walking away, and while Tom Wyatt met a nasty fate, he was far from the only one with blood on his hands. The second season was in many ways messier than Goliath season 1, but the darkness of the season 2 finale was a bold move.

Next: What To Expect From The Boys Season 2

Real Housewives’ Tinsley Mortimer Back Together With Boyfriend Scott Kluth

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Star of The Real Housewives of New York City Tinsley Mortimer is back together with her longtime boyfriend, Scott Kluth. The couple has had their ups and downs but is fighting for their love one last time.

Mortimer and Kluth have had an on again off again relationship for the past four years that has also been documented on the Bravo show. After Mortimer's previous marriage to Topper Mortimer from 2002 to 2010. The Palm Springs native had said that her dating life with Kluth was problematical as she was ready for a commitment and he was all too happy to take it slow. Fans watched as he showered her with expensive gifts, including a luxury car that he had shipped down from Chicago even though Mortimer had trouble driving it. As season 11 unraveled fans watched as Mortimer became more and more miserable with her fair-weather boyfriend and the uncertainty of their future, leading to a final break up only after the socialite researched how to freeze her eggs.

Related: Real Housewives’ Monique Samuels Faces Assault Charges After Alleged Candiace Dillard Fight

The tea officially was spilled yesterday at BravoCon where The Real Housewives of New York City’s Mortimer announced for the first time that she did get back together with Kluth while speaking on the Empire State of Wives panel. As fans cheered for the good news, Mortimer said, "I’m more excited than anybody!" The two reconciled back in October after a romantic trip to Toronto, Canada. At the time, a source revealed, "All the news came out at a tea party on Wednesday that all the Housewives were at and was being filmed." The insider explained, "Tinsley told the ladies about her and Scott’s trip to Canada together."

Back on October 26th, it was reported that the flashy couple was moving toward the decision of rekindling their steamy relationship. The couple only spent the weekend together, but it seems that he picked up right where they left off. The Big Apple Circus ringleader told her friends that she was smitten with Kluth once again and ready to try one more time to see if the two could work it out.

Now that the couple is back together, Mortimer also made note that she would plan to move to Chicago where Kluth’s life and the company are based. Fans are hoping that the move will not end in heartbreak, but rather a proposal. Here's to hoping that Kluth has gotten over his commitment issues and fans will be able to see Mortimer and Kluth’s love story unfold on the new season of The Real Housewives of New York City, which is set to premiere in 2020.

Next: Backstreet Boy AJ McLean Tutors Dancing with the Star’s Lauren Alaina

Source: Us Weekly

His Dark Materials: 10 Differences Between The Book & The HBO TV Show

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His Dark Materials is the latest book to be turned into a tv series - and it's not the first time, either. Phillip Pullman's fantasy trilogy has already been adapted for the big screen, but the new series seems to be succeeding where The Golden Compass failed. One of the major areas where the two adaptations differ, of course, is in how faithful they are the original source material. Although His Dark Materials is faithful to the heart of the books, it is happy to take liberties when it comes to specific plot points - whatever it takes to translate the story in the best way possible.

RELATED: His Dark Materials Mythology: Daemons & Dust Explained

While there are plenty of minor moments that the series changes or leaves out, there are definitely some bigger ones that will make book purists gnash their teeth - and these are the ten biggest changes from book to screen.

10 The Alethiometer

'The Golden Compass' is the name of the first book in the original trilogy, and it's one of the most important items in the series. However, the Alethiometer (the real name for the golden compass) is a little bit different in His Dark Materials. For one thing, it's square, rather than round - a minor cosmetic difference - and includes an extra engraving, of the last name of the Alethiometer's inventor. This may be an aesthetic addition, or it may mean that the provenance of the device is more important in the series. However, there is one other major difference - in the series, the Alethiometer is actually illegal, whereas in the original books, it is only rare.

9 Mrs. Coulter And Her Daemon

At first, it seems as though Mrs. Coulter and her daemon are just like they are in the books - a beautiful woman and a golden monkey. However, as the show has progressed, it has become apparent that there is one major difference: the series version of Mrs. Coulter is severed from her daemon. In the books, this is something done experimentally with children and adults in the North, but in the series, Mrs. Coulter can go far from her daemon, and doesn't feel pain when he does (as evidenced by her hitting him).

8 Will's World

In the books, the only 'other world' introduced in the first book is theoretical - the city in the lights, or the worlds talked about by a witch's daemon. However, in the series, the ability to pass between the worlds is introduced in only the second episode, when Lord Boreal crosses over into Will's world (and not for the first time). This is a wildly different way to introduce Will's world - not just in terms of timing, but in terms of making Will the central figure of this very different Oxford.

7 The Reporter's Daemon

In the books and in the series, Lyra meets an interesting woman at Mrs. Coulter's cocktail party - a journalist with a butterfly daemon. In the books, however, her encounter is very different. She first sees the woman when she is flirting with a man, and it is this conversation that reveals to Lyra that her mother is involved with the Gobblers.

RELATED: His Dark Materials Cast & Character Guide

Although the woman tries to ask her more questions, she is kicked out of the party by Mrs. Coulter. In the series, however, the reporter's fate is far worse. Instead of simply leaving (and ruining her career, from the sounds of Mrs. Coulter's threats), Lord Boreal escorts her into his car... and crushes her daemon, killing her instantly.

6 Touching Daemons

Another difference that is clearly seen in the moment that Boreal crushes the reporter's daemon is the difference in the prohibition on touching daemons in Lyra's world. In the books, this is so ingrained that no human would ever touch another's daemon, and vice versa. Even when Lyra is attacked, and Pantalaimon could change into a bear and kill the attacker, he cannot - it's just too taboo. However, in the series, this seems lessened. While people don't habitually touch other daemons, it seems that Boreal has no issue with it - and Mrs. Coulter is later seen being attacked by a bird-daemon when the Gyptians break into her home.

5 The Opening Scene

The books open with Lyra sneaking into the Retiring Room at Jordan College, ready to spy on the scholars. This scene does come at the start of the series, but first we see her being delivered to Jordan College as a baby, during the Great Flood.

RELATED: HBO’S His Dark Materials: 5 Things From The Books We Want To See (& 5 We Don’t)

This scene does actually happen (sort of) in the books - but not in the original trilogy. It is part of La Belle Sauvage, one of a follow-up series that covers Lyra's earliest history.

4 The Gyptian Ceremony

The time when a daemon settles on a form is a big deal, in both the series and the books - but the series has created an entirely new ceremony to mark this moment. In His Dark Materials, there is a Gyptian ceremony where everyone celebrates the time that a young person's daemon settles. Of course, this is a great way to bring up this element of the mythology, so it makes sense to add to the series, but it definitely doesn't exist in the books.

3 The Magisterium/Scholastic Sanctuary

While the Magisterium is a looming presence in both the original series and the TV version, there's no denying that they are significantly more powerful (and dangerous) on the small screen. While the books don't see the Magisterium much more than mentioned in the first book, the series jumps straight in with introducing major characters, intensifying Mrs. Coulter's connections to them, and giving them far more legal standing in this world. Anything that goes against the Magisterium is illegal, and only colleges have the ability to even ask questions, thanks to the new invention of 'scholastic sanctuary'.

2 Billy Costa/Tony Makarios

It's not uncommon for adaptations to combine two or more characters to make life a little easier - and that seems to be what His Dark Materials has done with Billy Costa and Tony Makarios. In the books, these are two distinct characters, both of whom are taken by the Gobblers - Billy is the Gyptian connection to the Gobblers, and Tony shows the reader how Mrs. Coulter tempts children away. However, in the series, Billy is introduced with a daemon named 'Ratter' - the name of Tony's daemon - and Tony is nowhere to be seen.

1 The Journey North

The entire first book of the series focuses on the journey North - and even here, there are some major changes made. First up, in the books, Lyra has no initial intentions of taking Roger with her (she actually forgets about him for a little while there!), but in the series, they discuss it several times, and she asks to take him. Later, she finds maps and plans in Mrs. Coutler's apartment, and the Gyptians break in to steal them - giving them an idea of where to go... whereas the book just sees them going blindly 'North'.

NEXT: His Dark Materials: 10 Things The HBO Series Needs To Get Right

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